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Public School Facts, History, and Education Issues » Testing

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TestTalk for Leaders-Issue 4: The Good News Behind Average NAEP Scores

Author(s): Dalia Zabala
Published: January 1, 2006

Issue 4: The Good News Behind Average NAEP Scores - Analysis of data from the October 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress report shows higher achievement scores by certain subgroups than the average.

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TestTalk for Leaders-Issue 3: My School Didn't Make Adequate Yearly Progress - So What Does That Mean?

Author(s): Nancy Kober
Published: October 1, 2004

Issue 3: My School Didn't Make Adequate Yearly Progress -- So What Does That Mean? - A brief overview of the significance of failing to meet adequate yearly progress as it relates to states' progress as defined by the No Child Left Behind Act.

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TestTalk for Leaders-Issue 2: What Tests Can and Cannot Tell Us

Author(s): Nancy Kober
Published: October 1, 2002

Issue 2: What Tests Can and Cannot Tell Us - A brief overview of the pluses and minuses of standardized testing.

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TestTalk for Leaders-Issue 1: Teaching to the Test: The Good, the Bad, and Who Is Responsible

Author(s): Nancy Kober
Published: June 1, 2002

Issue 1: Teaching to the Test: The Good, the Bad, and Who Is Responsible - A brief review of what constitutes good and bad practices in "teaching to the test." 

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