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The Achievement Gap: Slow and Uneven Progress for Students

Author(s): CEP
Published: December 14, 2010

Center on Education Policy's New Findings

After eight years of implementing the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and other school reforms, how much progress have states and school districts made in raising achievement for students from all backgrounds and closing achievement gaps based on race, ethnicity, income, and gender?

In its new report, the Center on Education Policy analyzed trends in reading and mathematics performance and achievement gaps for several groups of students: African American, Asian American, Latino, Native American, and white students, as well as low-income, male, and female students.

View the comments by CEP President Jack Jennings, as he shares his viewpoints on the report and what it means for education reform.

What are the key findings of the report on the achievement gap in schools?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

What are the messages the report communicates?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

What is the impact on low-income children?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

What needs to change in schools in order to close the achievement gaps for poor children and children of color?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

What are the highlights of the report concerning Hispanic and Native American students?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

What gaps did you find between male and female students?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

Which states have been able to close the achievement gap?

 

         

Jack Jennings, President, Center on Education Policy

Video content produced by Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity.


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